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The Fish are "Jumpin' in the Boats!!!"

Yesterday was a red letter day for fishing, and it happened right in front of us!!!  Now, everyone knows about how fishing boats go out and catch fish in just about every seashore country in the world, but I have never heard of how they do it here...We have shown pictures here in the blog, but here is what happens...

1.  A truck drives up with about 20 young men, and a boat, and a huge long net, and about 2000 yards of rope (line), and a couple of rollers for launching the boat...

2.  They unload the boat by pulling it out so that it over-balances and drops its bow to the sand, then the truck drives off about 20 feet, and they settle the stern to the sand...

3.  They pick up the bow, and one brave guy rolls the rollers in as far as he can, and then they tilt the boat forward and pull the rear roller back a ways.

4.  They now rotate the two rollers from front to back until they are in the water. 

 5.  Now four of the guys jump in the boat and grab oars, and a fifth man stands by to row and feed out line...but this is really hard...first the other guys are pushing the boat, men, net, and rollers into a surf that is pounding against them, and then when the boat begins to float a little, the four rowers must pull like crazy to keep the forward momentum against the wave action...they keep at it and soon the boat is beyond the breakers, and is feeding back line to the men on the beach...

6.  Now, these four men, and sometimes the fifth guy, must row like crazy, out about 1000 yards, all the while bearing right so that they can unload this huge net parallel to the beach, and then begin rowing back to the beach where half the guys are waiting to receive the boat, and most importantly to begin pulling on the line at the other end of the net...so you see, they made a huge semi-circle, and now both lines are being pulled into the beach, and trapping the fish as they go.

7.  They all pull and pull until the closed net comes into the surf and then some of them jump in to guide it in, and hold up sides to make sure that the fish stay in. 

 

Yesterday was a huge haul, and the word went out...take a look at one crew receiving their catch--complete with lots of folks getting free fish, and they are being leapfrogged by another crew pulling on one side of their net, while, at the same time another "boat-truck" crew watches from their truck, waiting to begin their operation.  Sort of gives you a snap shot of a bunch of the steps...

 

 

 

There was so much fish, that the yellow truck in the crowd was completely filled, and the crew was still carrying loads to it as it had to drive away to the fish processing plant.  And...there was a ton of fish left over for the people, so every person who had a plastic bag was able to fill it up.  Alfonso told us that there were plenty of smiles at the dinner tables in Manglaralto, last night.

Here are some of the people hauling their bags, and Alfonso, himself coming off work, picking up his daughter and her bag of fish.  Off camera, his son Jose, had filled a bag with about 25 pounds of fish...

 These two girls dropped their fish about a dozen times, but stayed with it to get their "feast" home to Mama...

 

 

 

 

 

Alfonso told us that the guys who do this back-breaking job for about 4 hours get between $5.00 and $10.00, if there is a good day for fish, like this one...'course they get a bag of fish, too.  The owner of the truck and boat gets about $25.00 per box of fish (the boxes are about a big as a large ice chest).

But...some days there are very few fish...but...not today...lots of smiles today!!! 

Also, kudos to Rox, who took all of these pictures...

A little note:  I have added a bunch of pictures to the "Thatch" entry, just in case you would like to see some new homes featuring thatch...

 

Posted on Tue, June 2, 2009 at 01:41PM by Registered CommenterBob & Roxanne | CommentsPost a Comment

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